You can find on this page the Phoenix old map to print and to download in PDF. The Phoenix historical map and the vintage map of Phoenix present the past and evolutions of the city of Phoenix in Arizona - USA.
The Hohokam created roughly 135 miles (217 km) of irrigation canals in old city of Phoenix, making the desert land arable. Paths of these canals would later become used for the modern Arizona Canal, Central Arizona Project Canal, and the Hayden-Rhodes Aqueduct as on Phoenix old map.

Phoenix historical map

Map of Phoenix historical

The Phoenix old map shows evolutions of Phoenix city. This historical map of Phoenix will allow you to travel in the past and in the history of Phoenix in Arizona - USA. The Phoenix ancient map is downloadable in PDF, printable and free.

The Hohokam carried out extensive trade with nearby Anasazi, Mogollon, and other Mesoamerican tribes. Native American names for the historical city of Phoenix include Skikik (O'odham), Wasinka (Yavapai), Fiinigis (Western Apache), Hoozdoh (Navajo), and Hachpa 'Anya Nyava (Mojave). It is believed that, between 1300 and 1450, periods of drought and severe floods led to the Hohokam tribe abandonment of the area as its mentioned in Phoenix historical map. Local Akimel O'odham settlements, thought to be the descendants of the formerly urbanized Hohokam, concentrated on the Gila River alongside those of the Tohono O'odham and Maricopa peoples. Some family groups did continue to live near the Salt River, but no large villages existed.

Father Eusebio Kino, an Italian Jesuit in the service of the Spanish Empire, was among the first Europeans to travel in the historical city of Phoenix in the 1600s and 1700s. By this time, the valley was within the territory of New Spain, which was controlled by Spain and later independent Mexico. Father Kino named the river "Río Salado" (Salted River) due to the water high mineral content. He interacted with the few native peoples who remained in the valley, but focused mostly on the Pima missions established in southern Arizona, as well as exploring other parts of the Southwest and California. Only southern Arizona experienced the full influence of Hispanic cultures; the Salt River Valley itself remained almost depopulated for several centuries as its shown in Phoenix historical map.

The history of Phoenix as a city begins with Jack Swilling, an American Civil War veteran who had come west to seek wealth in the 1850s and worked primarily in Wickenburg as you can see in Phoenix historical map. On an outing in 1867, he stopped to rest at the foot of the White Tank Mountains. Swilling observed the abandoned river valley and considered its potential for farming, much like that already cultivated by the military further east near Fort McDowell. The terrain and climate were optimal; only a regular source of water was necessary. The existence of the old Hohokam ruins, showing clear paths for canals, made Swilling imagine new possibilities. Swilling had a series of canals built which followed those of the ancient Native American system. A small community formed that same year about 4 miles (6 km) east of the present city. It was first called Pumpkinville due to the large pumpkins that flourished in fields along the canals. Later it was called Swilling Mill in his honor, though later renamed to Helling Mill, Mill City, and finally, East Phoenix. Swilling, a former Confederate soldier, wanted to name the city "Stonewall," after General Stonewall Jackson. Others suggested the name of "Salina." However, neither name was supported by the community.

Phoenix vintage map

Map of Phoenix antique

The Phoenix vintage map give a unique insight into the history and evolution of Phoenix city. This vintage map of Phoenix with its antique style will allow you to travel in the past of Phoenix in Arizona - USA. The Phoenix vintage map is downloadable in PDF, printable and free.

Lord Darrell Duppa suggested the name "Phoenix," as it described a vintage city born from the ruins of a former civilization. The Board of Supervisors in Yavapai County, which at the time encompassed Phoenix, officially recognized the new town on May 4, 1868, and formed an election precinct. The first post office was established on June 15, 1868, with Jack Swilling serving as the postmaster as its mentioned in Phoenix vintage map. With the number of residents growing (the 1870 U.S. census reported about a total Salt River Valley population of 240), a town site needed to be selected. On October 20, 1870, the residents held a meeting to decide where to locate it. A 320-acre (1.3 km²) plot of land was purchased in what is now the downtown business section.

On February 12, 1871, the territorial legislature created Maricopa County, the sixth one formed, by dividing Yavapai County. The first election for county office was held in 1871, when Tom Barnum was elected the first sheriff as its shown in Phoenix vintage map. Barnum ran unopposed as the other two candidates, John A. Chenowth and Jim Favorite, had a shootout that ended in Favorite death and Chenowth withdrawing from the race. Several lots of land were sold in 1870 at an average price of $48. The first church opened in 1871, as did the first store. Public school had its first class on September 5, 1872, in the courtroom of the county building. By October 1873, a small school was completed on Center Street (now Central Avenue). Land entry was recorded by the Florence Land Office on November 19, 1873, and a declaratory statement filed in the Prescott Land Office on February 15, 1872. President Ulysses S. Grant issued a land patent for the present site of Phoenix on April 10, 1874. The total value of the Phoenix Townsite was $550, with downtown lots selling for between $7 and $11 each. A short time later, a telegraph office, 16 saloons, four dance halls and two banks were opened.

By 1881, Phoenix had outgrown its original townsite-commissioner form of government. The 11th Territorial Legislature passed "The Phoenix Charter Bill", incorporating Phoenix and providing for a mayor-council government. The bill was signed by Governor John C. Fremont on February 25, 1881. Phoenix was incorporated with a population of approximately 2,500, and on May 3, 1881, Phoenix held its first city election (see Phoenix vintage map). Judge John T. Alsap defeated James D. Monihon, 127 to 107, to become the city first mayor. In early 1888, the city offices were moved into the new City Hall, at Washington and Central (later the site of the city bus terminal, until Central Station was built in the 1990s). This building also provided temporary offices for the territorial government when it moved to Phoenix by the 15th Territorial Legislature in 1889.